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My Breasts and I PART.2

My Breasts and I  PART.2

Hey hunnies,

First of all I need to apologise for taking so long to continue my write up. The initial plan was to make it just a 3 days interval before the next one, But Lagos happened *sigh*… I mean I got caught up in the hustle and bustle of Lagos.

So now, Back to the matter (in wizkid’s voice), lol

 

CAUSES OF NIPPLE DISCHARGE

 

For women who aren’t breastfeeding, the sight of nipple discharge can be alarming. But if you notice discharge from your nipple, there’s no reason to panic. While nipple discharge can be serious, in most cases, it’s either normal or due to a minor condition. It is rarely a sign of breast cancer. But it might be a sign of an underlying condition that requires treatment. If you’re still having menstrual periods and your nipple discharge doesn’t resolve on its own after your next menstrual cycle, make an appointment with your doctor to have it evaluated.

 

What is normal?

Normal nipple discharge more commonly occurs in both nipples and is often released when the nipples are compressed or squeezed. Some women who are concerned about breast secretions may actually cause it to worsen. They do this by repeatedly squeezing their nipples to check for nipple discharge. In these instances, leaving the nipples alone for a while may help the condition to improve.

 

Causes

  • Pregnancy. In the early stages of pregnancy, some women notice clear breast discharge coming from their nipples. In the later stages of pregnancy, this discharge may take on a watery, milky appearance.
  • Stopping breastfeeding. Even after you have stopped nursing your baby, you may notice that a milk-like breast discharge persists for a while.
  • Stimulation. Nipples may secrete fluid when they are stimulated or squeezed. ( Let him concentrate on the other parts of ur body for now *wink*)

What is abnormal Nipple discharge?

Bloody nipple discharge is never normal. Other signs of abnormality include nipple discharge from only one breast and discharge that occurs spontaneously without anything touching, stimulating, or irritating your breast.

Causes

A number of noncancerous conditions can cause nipple discharge.

Possible causes of abnormal discharge include:

  • Fibrocystic breast changes. Fibrocystic refers to the presence or development of fibrous tissue and cysts. Fibrocystic changes in your breasts may cause lumps or thickenings in your breast tissue. They do not indicate, though, the presence of cancer. In addition to causing pain and itching, fibrocystic breast changes can, at times, cause secretion of clear, white, yellow, or green nipple discharge.
  • Galactorrhea. It might sound scary. But galactorrhea simply describes a condition in which a woman’s breast secretes milk or a milky nipple discharge even though she is not breastfeeding. Galactorrhea is not a disease and has many possible causes. These include:
  1. Pituitary gland tumors
  2. Certain medications, including some hormones and psychotropic drugs
  3. Some herbs, such as anise and fennel
  4. Hypothyroidism
  5. Illegal drugs, including marijuana
  • Infection. Nipple discharge that contains pus may indicate an infection in your breast, also known as mastitis. This is usually seen in women who are breastfeeding. But it can develop in women who are not lactating. If you have an infection or abscess in your breast, you may also notice that your breast is sore, red, or warm to the touch.
  • Mammary duct ectasia. This is the second most common cause of abnormal nipple discharge. It is typically seen in women who are approaching menopause. This condition results in inflammation and possible blockage of ducts located underneath the nipple. When this occurs, an infection may develop that results in thick, greenish nipple discharge.
  • Intraductal papilloma. These are noncancerous growths in the ducts of the breast. They are the most common reason women experience abnormal nipple discharge. When they become inflamed, intraductal papillomas may result in nipple discharge that contains blood or is sticky in texture.

I hope this article has been able to answer some of the questions you might have but if you still have more questions, please feel free to ask or better still see your doctor.

 

 

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Written by StayHealthWise

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